The Single Stock Price Drop!

We’ve all experienced investing in a single company’s stock and the day after we buy them, the price tanks! Not only have we experienced it ourselves, but we hear about it happening to new investors on a regular basis. If you experience this, from my own experience, I would say to just stop what you’re doing. Don’t sell in a panic move. Remember why you purchased the stock. Are you investing or gambling? Are you wanting to be a penny stock gambler or an investor?

If you’re attempting to build wealth for the long term, you are a long-term investor. You would set your portfolio (stock/fund holdings) in a way that it could weather the ups and downs of the markets. Buying single company stocks, need to be weighed out properly. Think about what the share price is on the market and find out what it value truly is. Personally, I only look at stocks that offer a dividend as well, as these are more stable companies.

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Companies with a dividend, that never miss a dividend payment, you can pretty much bank on them not crashing and you should invest in them properly. Invest, not gamble remember. Don’t sell, just buy and hold. Let’s look at it in a different way. If the company has a dividend price of 0.06 every quarter and the share price is $10 per share and you have 1000 shares. When it pays a dividend of $0.06 and the stock price is $10, you will receive $60 or if you chose the option to reinvest (that’s what I do) that dividend payment will be moved towards an additional share(s) of the company. That would come out to 6 additional shares that on the next quarter you will receive dividends on 1006 shares. This compounds and compounds. Lets say for instance, the share price dropped to $5 a share, the company is still paying out at the same rate of $0.06 and your payment would still be $60 for a dividend payment, or if reinvested would come up to 12 new shares, giving you 1012 shares that you would receive dividends on the next quarter. Does this make sense to you?

A reduction in the price of a dividend paying company means when the next dividend payment comes, I’m getting more shares for the same money I would have gotten less on if the stock price was higher. It’s like a sale! Remember, your investing for the long term, not gambling.  Take the above example and compound that for four quarters a year, times ten years, assuming no price changes- that would give me 12 new shares every quarter, or 48 shares a year, times 10 years. That equates to 480 new shares, all the time growing and growing.

The point is, don’t panic. If you’ve purchased a quality company that is paying our a dividend, chances are the stock price itself will recover, just enjoy the additional shares you’ll get come dividend payment time.

Some good quality stocks I think, that pay dividend are:

Pick strong companies. The above are just my choices. Also, note that dividend payments can increase and decrease depending upon the cash flow of the company, this is why I said to look at those companies with a track record for paying out and or increasing dividends such as the above notes stocks. You can research them out yourself here.

If you want to be more diversified, which I do believe in, and still get dividends as described above, think about investing in an index fund such as VFINX – S&P 500 Index Fund where you are much more diversified. If you remember our Couch Potato Investor mini article you will remember this is exactly the fund suggested. Our Lazy Portfolio.

As always, do your own research. I am sharing what I do and I am simply advising on my own experience. Complete your own due diligence. Research the companies you wish to invest in or better yet, buy a piece of them all with a good low-cost index fund.

I would like to hear your thoughts and ideas.

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Invest or Downsize

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Should you invest additional money month over month, increasing your investment contribution so that you can retire from your job earlier or should you downsize to reduce outgoing cash flow?

In my opinion, both. But let me tell you why.

If I reduce my costs or expenses that go out month over month, then I am also reducing the amount of money needed to actually retire on, so the amount I will need to invest changes. If I am going to work until I am 65 or 70, then the amount I will need to invest is small month over month if I have a small expense list. If I have a lot of bills every month and I’m riddled with debt I’m constantly having to pay on like high-interest credit cards and evil car loans then I have less to invest with and I obviously need more cash or income every month just to get by. But this also means I will certainly have to work until I’m 65 or 70 because I’m having to pay on said debt. Clear as mud right!

To clear said ‘mud’ up a bit lets provide an example. Say I have a household income of $60,000 a year after taxes. The average household income which includes both parents working. I know some make more and some less, but this is the average. Both have cars which are financed, the average car payment is right around $500 a month. Since both have cars that are financed, that $1,000 a month just in car payments! That $12,000 a year, gone… Now add on full coverage insurance for the cars which is another $200 a month, there’s $2,400 a year. That’s already about $15,000 of our income, out the window.  Now tackle credit cards which the average American household has 6 credit cards. Have you noticed we haven’t even started paying on the bills we need to pay just to survive such as home, food, water, electric, nor have we gone over insurances, clothes or travel costs. Our average apartment rents are $1,200 per month for a two bedroom apartment and for a three bedroom home $1,500 per month in a mortgage. Personally, I think we are in another housing bubble because we didn’t learn from the last one.

Debt payments, take away the number one asset building tool we have; our income. But, what if we were to downsize? What if we bought a small tiny home on a small piece of land we paid cash for. Or RV or toy hauler? Now I don’t have rent or mortgage payments to contend with. The big house doesn’t impress anyone because honestly, nobody cares about your home or fancy clothes. Only you and your ego care about how big your home is or if you have the latest fashion line. What if I paid off my debts, my credit card debt, car loans debt. What is instead of $30,000 of my family’s income being paid out in debt payments could be utilized on investing for our future? Check out my post on investing for my compound interest spreadsheet. But just for a quick summary, $30,000 divided out over 12 months is $2,500. If I placed that same $2,500 inside my investments, starting from absolutely nothing, making market index average returns each year, I would hit the one million dollar mark in just 14 years and hit the 2 million dollar mark, just shy of six years later. That where you’re paying your debt payments to. Making other companies and bank filthy stinking rich off of your monthly payments.

On the flip side of that, if you didn’t have to pay all of those monthly payments out each month, would you really need a million dollars in order to retire?….. The answer is a resounding, no. Without major debt expenses you income need reduces. Getting all of your income needs down to the basics, as in Electric, water, food, travel expenses, little entertainment each week. How much do you really need for that? Each month, roughly $2,000 a month, on the super high side. If all of your expenses only added up to $2,000 each month, going on the safe withdrawal rate of 4% from your investments, total assets to pull from $650,000. This actually gives you a little more than $2,000 each month pulling out at 4%. This leaves money in there still growing as well because the markets on average make more than 4% so effectively you’ll never run out of money.

If you have enough month inside your investments to pay your bills each month at only using the safe withdrawal rate of 4%, then you can effectively retire. So reduce debt payments, eliminate them then invest heavily. once your ready to retire then go retire from what you have to do and start doing what you love to do. If your lucky enough to love what you do, then never retire.

Let me know what you think. Agree, or disagree?

The Couch Potato Portfolio

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The Couch Potato Portfolio- is a simple, automatic investment strategy. Notice the two terms- Investments & Strategy. Investments are for the long term, holding through the good and the bad. This brings me into -Strategy. A strategy is a plan, keeping the emotion factor out of the mix. Believe me, emotion WILL play a role if you don’t have a game plan to deal with it.

Let’s talk about setting up a fund. What type do you use? There are many options and I use two different types, both utilizing the same setup, set it and forget it strategy. The first one is a ROTH I.R.A (if your in the US) and the second one being a traditional brokerage account. The ROTH I.R.A. – Is like a retirement account, a personal 401K if you will. There are rules with this type of account. Once you place money into the fund, you need to be careful if you are attempting to withdraw the money out of it if you aren’t within the specific age range, or you will incur a penalty/tax. But if you set this account up and fund it each year (limit of $5,500 annually) it will provide you with tax-free wealth when you reach the age of retirement. (Assuming you invested it into the proper funds.) The second type of account is simply an investing account. Think of it like a bank account that allows you to hold stocks, bonds, funds, and cash. There is no limit to the amount you fund into this account each year, but it doesn’t have the same tax benefits as a ROTH I.R.A. does. If you must choose between the two, because maybe you don’t have the funds to fill up the ROTH and still invest into a regular brokerage accounts and selected funds, choose the ROTH, because you investing for your future, not an emergency.

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So now on to the different types of Investment funds. Just opening a brokerage account or ROTH account at a brokerage firm, is not investing. That would just be a glorified bank account. Once the money is in there, you must invest it (buy a fund/stock/bond/index) in order for your money to be “invested.” A lot of funds have minimums to be able to invest in them, to begin with. Some don’t. Some funds are bought and sold just like stocks are and those are known as ETF’s (exchange-traded funds.) ETF’s are just fine, but not easily set up for the set it and forget it, model of investing. My suggestion, or at least what I have done, is funded my account, with each paycheck until I was able to reach the minimum to buy into a particular fund.

As I said earlier, watch for fees and the best way to do that, is to avoid them all together. Mutual funds charge a percentage annually ranging from 1%-4%. Think if you will, your fund earned 11% for that year, which is great, but then the fund manager pulls 3% of your earnings out, now you’re left with 8%. This is still good, but what if your year wasn’t that great and you only brought in 7% in earnings, now after they pull their 3% – Your year earnings was really only 4%. That’s not very good now, is it? The funds still get to boast that they averaged 11% or 7% for the year. Doesn’t seem right now, does it? This is why I go with funds known as Index Funds. Index funds attempt to match the market such as the S & P 500, and they charge for a fee less than 1/2 of a percent. That’s 0.05%. Which means let’s say, I earn 9.5% average over the year. When they deduct their percentage, I’ve still earned 9% (This is a simplified explanation, but the result is the same.)

Since the Great Depression, the S&P 500, has averaged 10%. Some years being 20% followed by -5% then by 15%, so on and so on. But its the law of averages over time, utilizing compound interest over that time, that builds the wealth. Let me give you an example: Let’s say you invested 25$ a month into an index fund, that averaged 10%. You did this for your child as soon as they were born, you never had to invest anything else but 25$ each month. When your child was 50 years old, they would be worth over a million dollars. OVER a million dollars. That’s the power of compound interest. Your total investment cost is $15,000 but the payout is massive in comparison. Don’t you think it wise to invest for your child? What if you could teach your child to invest even more than $25 a month? Especially when they are a working adult. Think of even when your old and wrinkled, and your children have their own adult life and family, your still taking care of them and their future even long after your dead and gone.

There is a lot more to dig into, such as what would it take for you to retire? Do you really need as much as they say you will? Will it really take as long? How much do you need to sacrifice? How do I find the right fund for me? Can I afford it? (If you can put $25 a month away, even for yourself, then yes you can afford to invest in your future.)

I will also try to add in an excel spreadsheet tool to show you in a visual way how to achieve the success you want. (I love this tool, can’t wait to add it.)

If you get anything from this post: I hope you’ve at least gotten a small sense of knowing, that you really can change your future in a big way! Just by having the same knowledge the 1% has about consistent investing and time. You need both to build wealth, otherwise your gambling.

As promised, please click the link to get a great investment calculator. Net-worth-calculator. Play around with the calculator and see what it would take you to retire the way, and when you like. Also utilize it to see just maybe, if you can begin investing for your own young ones.